Skip to main content

About your Search

20131101
20131130
SHOW
Book TV 64
( more )
STATION
CSPAN2 427
LANGUAGE
English 427
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 427 (some duplicates have been removed)
that, you know, the cultural appropriation question is one that bothers us, absolutely, that cultures are, you know, they are borderless. i mean, we live right next to each other, always cultures informing and influencing each other, and you're right is that there's so much new produced that one of the things that black culture does is it is constantly on guard, constantly creating and recreating something new. you mentioned justin bieber and robin thicke, is it, you know, and this is what you can tell young people is it's tired. it's, you know, we listen to it and say that sounds like robin gaye, r and b30 years ago, so it's right that there is a constant mobility in moving in the sort of creativity of what's created right outside is more interesting and exciting than what happened on that mtv stage. i don't watch it. it doesn't suit me in my way. >> at the same time, i would hasrd to guess that creativity is under assault by the high mind lack of real culture that's being in their heads all the time. it is something to think about, and i think what you say about what you and your ow
: delighted to be with you. >> host: you serve as ambassador to the u.s., pakistan's ambassador to the u.s. from 2008 to 2011. you advised the late benazir bhutto and you are now professor at austin university and the director of the south and central asia hudson institute. you write extensively for "the new york times," "the wall street journal" and the national tribune to name a few of the publication so you obviously have a very inside view of this relationship and i think just the title is strong of u.s. policy toward pakistan and in your words if i may quote you say the u.s. pakistan relationship, a tale of exaggerated expectations, broken promises and disastrous misunderstandings. i want to delve into what you mean by that a little later in the interview but first i want to ask you a simple question. what motivated you to write this book? >> guest: this book has been on my mind for many years. i was a college student in 1979 when several of my colleagues -- i was in karachi in the south of pakistan but my colleagues as students in islamabad even in burn down the u.s. consulate the ho
to a live picture of the u.s. capital. the house and senate both out for thanksgiving recess. president obama has ordered flags to be flown at half staff until sundown today as today marks the 50th anniversary of the assassination of president kennedy. >> this weekend booktv is live in florida for the miami book fair international. coverage kicks off saturday at 10:00 eastern on c-span2 with dave barry, brad meltsir, lawrence wright, doris kerns goodwin, nathaniel of philbrick and call ins with peter baker and susan herman. sunday's coverage starts at 10:30 and includes john higher oilman and chris matthews. miami book fair international live on booktv on c-span2 and don't forget to weigh in on our november book club question, what books are you reading on jfk. post your thoughts any time on our book club chat room, booktv.org/bookclub. >> ladybird johnson was the first wife of a president to become a millionaire by investing in and running radio and tv stations in texas. watch our program saturday at 7:00 eastern on c-span, live monday night our series continues. >> the historic trip t
. >> the fed used to have reserves and one of the changes is that now they can pay it and they look at the new tool of the interest rate. >> and number of people to put this in context a number of people have been arguing one of the problems in terms of funding investment in the private sector is that the fed is taking the money out of the system by paying interest on reserves. i think there is very little evidence that that is the case created the design of the policy was primarily to make sure that there was control over the rate to keep the fund rate is much narrower than they had been. remember that as a time when it was all over the place. it seemed to have worked quite effectively, and i think the evidence to that policy is pretty positive. the evidence against it in terms of its long-term effect is minimal. that doesn't mean that it couldn't be used to harm the private sector by taking the money out of the economy because they have discretion on the rate by which it pays for those funds obviously by the race that would be too high you could do a lot of damage but i don't think there is
obviously have an inside view of this relationship. and i think just the title is a strong indictment of u.s. policy towards pakistan. and in your words if i may quote, you said the u.s. pakistan relationship, a tale of exaggerated expectation, broken promises and disastrous misunderstandings. i want to delve into what you mean by that a little later in the interview but first i want to ask you a simple question. what motivated you to write this book? >> as this book has been on my mind for many years i went to college in 1979 when several of my colleagues -- i was in karachi in the south of pakistan but my colleagues as students in islamabad burned dow turned dow. embassy and people at karachi also wanted to go and burn down the u.s. consulate. all of this was over an incident that had taken place in the holy place of islam. the shrine had been taken over by government and the threat americans were involved so people just went berserk. i was somebody that said we can't do this. we have to wait. we will not be able to unburden it to the next day if we find out that the americans are not invo
will illustrate some of the points with case studies in which dna has been used in forensic contexts. so our body is a marvelous collection of about 100 trillion cells and inside almost all of these cells is the nucleus of a cell here. we can find dna. the dna is organized along chromosomes. he can observe the center of microscope and if we look very closely at these chromosomes, we see this double helix structure, the classic structure of the dna molecule. along the dna are these bases and its dreams of those bases that compose genes. we humans have about 21,000 genes and each gene and codes an important component of our body an important protein or enzyme. so we can think of the dna sequence as the body's instruction manual. it's the shop manual for the human body. i will show you a little of the sequence here and you can't read this. this is about 3000 bases, dna bases, a very tiny proportion of our total dna sequence. in fact each of ourselves our cells has about 3 billion dna-based pairs. so what i'm showing you here is roughly 1 million of the human genome and the genome is our entire dna-b
the use of virtual currencies. then, a look at the process that granting security clearances for federal workers and contractors. and live at noon eastern, a heritage foundation panel on the deal struck in geneva, switzerland, on iran's nuclear program. >> today the heritage foundation examines the deal reached this it's weekend in geneva, switzerland, on iran's nuclear weapons program. watch the event live starting at noon eastern here on c-span2. also here on c-span2, a look at u.s./canada military relations. we'll be live at 1:30u p.m. eastern. >> the senate homeland security committee last week examined the government's ability to regulate digital currencies like bitcoin. this hearing is two and a half hours. [inaudible conversations] >> well, good afternoon, everyone. thank you for joining us. we especially want to thank our witnesses, panel number one, and somewhere out in the audience, panel number two. lost your id card, go around and pick it up, please, and put it where it belongs. that way we'll know who you are, and you will too. senator rockefeller, who i succeeded here in th
, but it has made a difference in our country and he inspired many of us to be involved in politics. much legislation sprang from inch of rain his original agenda but we will talk more about that this afternoon. just remembering always that resident kennedy said children are our greatest resources and best hope for future and hopefully that will be the spirit of this budget that we think in terms of our children, their families and their future. thank you all. .. >> the world of cable from that of author with the big picture. >> secretary of state john kerry told the senate foreign committee that the united states should ratify the disability act. >> good morning, this hearing on the sena aate floor of the righ of people with disability comes to other. let me thank secretary kerry for being here. first, i think he has the thanks of all us on the committee for the incredible work you have been doing across the globe. and your presence sends a strong message about the importance of the issue. we appreciate you coming back to chair. we received the support of thousands of people and organiza
avenue. the marine band was just passing this horrifying sight for all of us, swinging down pennsylvania avenue, the west point cadets in the contingent from annapolis and the air force academy and the coast guard. escorting their late commander and it is hard to realize that on this marvelously clear and beautiful, understandably beautiful day, this is what we are all coming to washington to witness. the crowd that has gathered is not a large one. it is one deep in most places because most of the crowd will be along the large march later. beyond the white house to which the procession is now going. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >> passing sixth street and pennsylvania avenue ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ we are at the junction of independence avenue and pennsylvania avenue. and they will shortly make this turn into pennsylvania avenue. for the long broad approach to the white house. from there to the white house. now the first cause to make the turn. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >> how the cars are approaching the junction of constitution and pennsylvania avenue, constitution avenue is t
to does his support for the treaty. i know, that the secretary changed his schedule to be with us today. he's a keynote speaker at the disability-related event this evening in new york. we'll be excusing him around 4:30 or so do so. secretary, we're pleased for joining us. thank you for rearranging your schedule today. i will leave congresswoman duckworth to be recognized by senator dire bin. someone who has done a tremendous amount of work on the cannot of veteran's affairs and personal testimony about her personal experience as a wounded warrior is invaluable to the committee. i want to ask former attorney general who is here to discuss the practical importance of ratification, and let me also recognize his wife, jenny, who is accomplished in the field of disability advocacy. we appreciate you being here as well. let me ask dr. susan from the catholic family and human rights institute. professor timothy meyer, the assistant professor school of law. and michael faris to join us as well as they offer their views on the treaty. thank you, all. let me turn to senator occur bib. >> t
next on booktv she talks about the role of u.s. special operation forces in the world today and argues that they will be this country's primary military force for many years to come. she was in a special office in afghanistan in 2011. this is about one hour. >> ladies and gentlemen, good evening. i am the ambassador. my role tonight is just to host and nothing else. i am happy to have for another time in nine, ten months the women policy group at the croatian embassy. i'm very happy to have you here as frequently as possible, because these events are really very nice. i will say no more except we are happy also the embassies keep open in washington. [laughter] and while my pleasure and honor to have ms. linda robinson whom i met at georgetown? we shared one evening -- and i must say that probably i was the most attentive of all the listeners at your part of the presentation which has to do with what you are going to talk about tonight. so, that much for a knee. i am sorry that we have bring you from the food so quickly, but time is running. [applause] >> thank you so much, a
of reasons. >> can you say it one more time? >> i'm often, can really compete for the u.s. on a level playing field basis with everyone else said why don't we build anything? in fact, we felt a lot here and it's time it came from athens, georgia last evening because yesterday we cut the ribbon on a brand-new greenfield factory 850,000 square feet. 1400 people strong when it's fully operational at the end of next year. these will be small bulldozers and small excavators that were formally only produced in japan. we brought those to the united states for several reasons. one, we can compete from the base there to relate the ports in here and that production will stay in the u.s. in the exported to south america and europe. we feel there is a very good chance at a very good condition to not only build here, but compete to a u.s. base. a year ago we did the same thing in victoria, texas on another excavator plan. these are the large machines. 42 that 5010 machines that came in from japan that will be built in us for the first time in the united states and exporting to south america. some of that
and capacity to control the impulses was virtually nonexistent. the genetic evidence was used to challenge it saying the person didn't have the necessary mental state. to provide a novel serious -- that the person's own self provoked him rather than some external person, totally novel theory; right? and try to mitigate. didn't work in this case, and hasn't worked in a lot of cases because the objective circumstances are different than the neurological evidence. evidence of planning as we ordinarily understand it by a guy, taking it to a place, pulling a trigger saying die all right. those objective things lint face a lot of neurological ens. this just tells you -- the red bar is bad for the criminal defenses. the blue bar is good for the criminal defenses. whenever you are in the room you should see a lough red. you should see a little bit of blue and the little bit of blue you should see is around mitigation. in effective assistance of counsel mitigation, and soming aggravation. in general, it's not working we again, remember it's a subset of cases. it may be more effective i
because part of the systems where the chances for a debt for another is one in 20,000 where it used to be the most common killer of women in the mid part of a letter century. if you have to have assembled gallbladder operation or you have a child with a complication of a long problem, he will suddenly asked which plays are you going? you have to go here. and that is a firm that we haven't lifted, but we can. and i think there are interesting ways to know how to read >> thank you, everybody. >> in january, 1963, they had done something they didn't do before to the the the state and they fought and as a result, five american were shot down, three americans were killed. kennedy sees this on the front page and says what's going on here? i thought we were winning this war. over the course of the next several months in fact in december and janaria into february he was going to hear varying reports from white house officials, state department officials and military officials giving the contradictory evidence about the state of the military campaign in south viet nam. >> 48 hours of nonfict
inside view of this relationship and i think just the title is a strong indictment towards the u.s. and pakistan. you say that the relationship, entail of exaggerated expectations and broken promises and disastrous misunderstandings, i would like to delve into what you mean by that little later in the interview. at first i'm asking you a simple question. what motivated you to write this book? >> guest: this book has been on my mind for so many years. i was a college student in 1979. several of my colleagues, as in students, burned it down the u.s. embassy and people also wanted to go down to the u.s. consulate in berlin that done as well. all of this had taken place when the holiest mosque and shrine of government had been taken down. so people just went berserk. and i was someone who said no, we can't do this, we have to wait. we burned down the building, we won't be able to on verdict on the next day. if we wait, we could find out that the americans are not involved. because of that come i was always wondering why the pakistanis have this knee-jerk anti-americanism. because what
morning encased 12158, bond v. u.s.. >> mr. chief justice and may it please the court. of the statute at issue year does reach every malicious use of chemicals anywhere in the nation as the government insists then it clearly exceeds congress''s limited and enumerated powers. this court's cases made clear it is a bedrock principle of the federal system that congress lacks general police power to criminalize conduct without regard to jurisdictional element or some nexus to a matter of distinctly federal concern. the president's negotiant and the senate and ratification of treaties with foreign nations does not change the bedrock principle of our constitutional system. >> the 3d is valid and the implementing of legislation seems to largely copy without getting anything so the treaty could be constitutional but implementing legislation adds nothing is constitutional. >> i would quarrel with your premise. it is through the convention in the statute used similar terms and terminology. there's one important difference between the convention and the statute that differentiates
is using airport kioskss, assessing a gms, using teleconferencing facilities obtaining multimedia digital content through their computer or cellphone any time any place of standard harmonization is absolutely vital to the u.s. and u.s.-based companies and we can see three reasons it can help. first, it embraces inclusion in a d a. and u.s. access ability standards so for the u.s. companies it is important to implement. these harmonize standards for investment in accessible technology and help us achieve positive return on investment. finally, it helps the u.s. ability to continue to lead innovation more wide as crpd country's interest the accessibility leadership and our ability to influence them is diminishing. onto the policy benefits it is no exaggeration to say that in many cases policies make markets. the u.s. section 508 is a great example. prior to the enactment of the federal procurement policy the accessibility marketplace was not an investment priority but section 508, the buying power of the u.s. government have transformed the marketplace and played a major role in def
notice we have the scale of sheets that are on your table. they are reviews. we use them -- we review them very carefully afterwards. that is why we think our programs have improved over the years because we listen to what you have to say and try to give you the type of programs you really are interested in. we would also have another announcement. our committee will be having on friday november 15 an address addressed by ambassador marc grossman. he is the vice-chairman of the cohen group. he will be speaking about the diplomatic campaign in afghanistan and pakistan. he will be at the university club at 8:00 a.m. on november 15 so please take out your black areas in iphones. we also have another speaker. the senior adviser for transnational homeland security and counterterrorism program at the center for strategic and international studies. that will be wednesday december 4. also at 8:00 a.m. to 9:00 a.m. and that also will be held at the university club which is on 16th street in the northwest. i also have a very special announcement. as many of you know the aba standing committee i
telling us anywhere from 20 to 80% of their individual business is being councils so that's a big spread and some pretty big numbers. it could be a substantial number of people getting those notices. >> host: how are employers picking the ones to cancel? >> guest: insurers are looking at this and they are saying policies that didn't exist before march of 2010 or new policies that people have purchased since 2010 are unlikely to be grandfathered. if they are not grandfathered and don't meet the requirements of the affordable care act it's likely they will get a notice. to put this in context before the affordable clean air act insurers would cancel policies. it was an unusual. they would discontinue product lines that weren't profitable for them. this is not unusual but what is unusual is the scope of and number of people that are likely to get these. >> host: consumer advocates are concerned that insurers are using these cancellations to target their most costly enrollees. >> guest: some consumer advocates are worried that maybe they are just taking unprofitable lines of business. insure
. >> attorney general thornberg, we all recognize that the u.s. is the gold standard on disability rights. if we're at the gold standard, i mean, i certainly understand why it's in our best interest to have other countries obligate themselves to meet our gold standard, but i don't get why we should be ratifying a treaty that obligates us to do things that are still open to or subject to interpretation. that's my concern. i think that's the core concern of those that may not be supportive of the treaty currently. can you explain that to me? >> i think so. the basic gap in understanding is what the consequences of ruds are. the treaty that's adopted includes the reservations in understandings and deck collar rations that accompany it. when we say we're not going to do something that we specified we do not include within the am bit of the treaty amended by ruds, it doesn't mean we flout convention, but that we implement it with the ruds in mind, and that's true not only of what the united states does, but other countries -- >> if we're the gold standard, what do we have to interpret in implementing
national park in this map as well. and yet using it as an example, 66 parts per billion, which is above what some of the proposed standards are and are being considered. and i guess i would just ask if you are aware that some of the most remote and pristine parks of the country have an ozone that exceeds the range of this proposed standard? >> there is no proposed standard at this point. let's just make sure that people are not confused by that. but i would also say that i know the science advisory board is looking at this issue with the staff so they can establish some recommendations to me, moving forward and take a look at these issues. >> okay. maybe there isn't a proposed standard and it depends on what the meaning of the word is is and we could go back to technical definitions. but there is certainly definitions of a standard of 60 parts per billion. >> i do not know whether that is part of the consideration that the science advisory board will advise her advising on. >> this spring we were told that that was a standard that they were considering and that they were not only consid
add on to the standard that is required before you can even investigate less useful tool becomes. for example, if you talk about reason to believe the number me lead to contact in the united states, that is exactly what we are trying to find out here. we have got a number. if we have a terrorist phone number, what exactly we are trying to find out is do we have information to think that this may lead to the drooping investigation in the united states? >> one quick thing, raj, if i could. on the question of follow-up, there is a very close review of the ras determination itself. what is your review of how the fbi uses the information that is generated? >> we use the information as it was indicated to further our investigative efforts so we can open up on their investigation perhaps, or we can open up an investigation. but it's the sort of review process to go and look at what was the outcome, how was it used, how do we come from or not confront an individual to the tracing all the way down to the street or to the fbi follow-up investigation. what sort of assessment or tracking is
give us some sense of a total cost for this and what it's going to cost to field it over at the department of defense? >> i can't speak to the total cost. i would have to come back with hat information, but i can give you a status of how the automated continuous evaluation system sbg used. it -- is being used. it has the capability of flagging concern. so that's an existing capability. as you mentioned, it was used in an army project. ut of 3,300-odd individuals, a total of 100 personal actions were taken as a result of information identified during those queries. in addition, the defense security enterprise is developing a continuous evaluation concept demonstration, which would take this a step further. aces, the automated continuous evaluation system, does a one-time snapshot in time query, this concept demonstration would have real time updates so that as information became available it would be pushed into the system. and the concept demonstration is currently scheduled to run from april to october of 2014. the anticipated population would be 100,000 cleared military
to fight the good fight. we are troy davis. [applause] if you would start by giving us a little bit of your upbringing in a religious history. >> i am the grants up of a baptist preacher and the nephew of two other baptist preachers in my family was about the evangelical but i grew up deep in evangelical culture then and i went to high school in miami florida >> host: what was her family's reaction when you came out as gay? >> guest: they were not excited my mother cried and cried and cried. extremely difficult in a relationship but i don't think all of my relatives know yet a funny thing in the chinese family the way information is passed around. the chinese lehr the christian in layer eight and between the two there is shame my parents have not exactly broadcast it to everyone. >> host: you have written a book whether or not jesus loves to. what is your christianity today? >> guest: and i attended a reformed church in brooklyn diamond older there isn't the faith of those goes through peeks and valleys i would be lying if i would say in his consistent. is a struggle. you look fatah or ever
that the administration has made to nato to take the u.s. deployment of u.s. missile defenses to defend the u.s. from europe in to deployment of nato missile defense to nato to defend nato. that was the fundamental shift that occurred in september of 2009. to take system that was able deploy against possibly ten incoming missiles and put in place a nato system under nato command and control put the deference of nato countries. that is the kind of commitment to deterrence that we put in place. we put in place contingency plan to make sure that every nation that is a member of nato has a plan to be defended. that was an important contribution to deterrence. we just completed this month -- this week, last week. the first major article r5 last exercise. the alliance was conducted in the last ten years. many of the country nas participated in the exercise had never participated in an article five exercise and we just completed that. those are the kinds of steps that matter for collective desks. far more than the nuclear weapons you have. particularly when the cost of modernizing the nuclear weapons runs i
and the first thing we'll do is i'll use my conventional forces, and if that fails, use strategic forces. i tell you, it's going to turn around. don't think about it in a nuclear sense, but think strategic first, coming from great distance or no distance, to solve a problem. last, think about the conventional forces and moving and huge costs of standing armies and moving them to the problem. it's just the reality we have to deal with, and how we're going to do that, how are we going to afford it, those are the the questions, i think, that we're going to, as an alliance, come to grips with and understand how to do that; ours, we're not matching resources and capabilities with the security that we desire to have. >> thank you. >> other than that i'm in a good place. >> that leaves a good place. the leading expert brings a dose of reality, make it a concern, particularly such with europe. when you hear those speakers, particularly john cartwright's point about, you know, we have to be ability to exercise and leverage increasing speed and deploy our forces. do you see this happening in nato? is nato
to defy his own party to some extent but it didn't occur to us to think these poor people. i also believe this was not stimulated by the politicians. this is genuine public anger. >> and appointed fairness the house republicans leadership step up and john boehner, eric cantor, paul ryan. >> they replace their negotiator >> they had no negotiator. >> yes they did. >> they still had a majority voting against them. >> understand but let's give credit where it is due. >> in my experience when the house leadership republican house leadership cares they do better than the minority of their own party. >> i have serious reservations about that characterization. i think a lot of people went to the floor on that monday and voted no because they thought the leadership have the votes to pass the bill. they couldn't gather -- gavel back in. i think that was true of both sides. >> not so much on your side. nobody ever casts political votes on your side. >> on this one judd wait a second. it's about politicians and politics and i know that may upset some people because we are only supposed to these talk
industry. we want to go up to new york now, where daniel yergin is joining us. he is the author of both "the quest," and "the prize." you have been to cushing oklahoma. how would you describe it? guest: you see all of the tanks, and it is quiet, and you have the oil moving at the stately rate of four miles per hour. it is very calm, yet you realize it is one of the notable points in the oil industry, and we see on the reports of what the oil price was, it all goes back to cushing, which has been a great gathering point, really, for about a century now. host: why does it all go back to cushing? guest: there was an oil field discovered there before the first world war and it was called the queen of the oil fields, and at one point it provided 22% of the u.s. total oil, and a lot of the oil produced by the u.s. army in europe was made in cushing oklahoma, and the oil system was old, but the pipeline system had been set up to move supplies around so it became the gathering point. it all flowed through cushing and went out to other pipelines two refineries around the country to make products
. we all acknowledge that the treaty is based upon basically the u.s. law, the ada. we passed that in 1990. i remember in 1991, congressman hoyer who was then chairman of u.s. helsinki commission traveled to moscow and became part of the moscow declaration document, which started the international effort to use u.s. law as the model to protect universal -- university the rights of people with disabilities. so the united states has been leadership. the point i would raise, that failed to ratify i think compromises the u.s. ability to advance these standards globally. it weakens our own credibility to participate in the development internationally of the rights of people with disabilities and is the chairman pointed out and as others have pointed out it also compromises very much american citizens who are in other countries and their own protections if we happen to ratify the treaty we're sorting out in the same position as we would for the rights of people in our own country. secretary ridge, your comments, generally. >> i just wanted to respond to a but a very appropriate ques
afraid to use that word and that idea. recognizing islam as a great religion but see no contradiction one dash contradiction to rally the nation to fight the perverted bridge that attacked us on 9/11. i wrote at the time and i believe to this day in bet with the infrastructure that will carry us through this war. it is a backhanded tribute. to the very people that did criticize but they adopted the very same tools as you decrease to them they your administration had created just as truman did to provide the infrastructure, the tools and the institutions that carry us through the cold war and will carry us through in this generation and if i could just repeats i spoke to my wife earlier today she asked me to convey her admiration and respect for what you did for our country, this readiness of your voice and your determination to see things through even when you were nearly alone. i am supposed to be selling books but i had to say that first. [applause] >> especially the white part. otherwise i will sleep on the couch to night. [laughter] the book is called things that matter and it is very
to actually affect the individual lives of citizens here in the country? is there a way of us coming together and writing ruds in that way? >> senator, thank you for the question. i think with respect to the federalism issue, a federalism reservation could address the federalism problem that you've identified. federalism reservation could, i think, be drafted to be somewhat stronger than the reservation that currently reservation attached to the resolution for ratification that came out last year. conceivably such a reservation would make very clear what the e numb rated powers that congress possesses are. and reserve out of any obligations that couldn't be satisfied through the exercise of those powers. with respect to the interpretation issue, i think a set of understanding could be drafted that would make very clear that the united states does not accord any significance to the interpretation of the convention afforded by the committee. i think it would go a long way toward addressing the concern that the convention might be used to interpret federal statutes including essentially preexist
exercise rights of its owners and forth is a roots that only judge walton in the district here used which is the third-party standing doctrine. i would like to begin by looking at the claims of the gilardi's as individuals. several things are undisputed. the gilardi's control and make the decisions for the companies including what goes in and what's kept out of the company health plans. third the gilardi have a well-documented religious or four of the hhs mandate challenge here today requires the companies to include those things and their plans for face significant lines. and five those things should only be included in the plan if francis philip gilardi direct them to be included. given those undisputed facts it's our view that the court should have applied the test of the thomas case and asked whether the hhs mandate put substantial pressure on the gilardi's to modify their long-standing behavior and violate their religious police. the responses of course it does. they either abandon their religious belief that they can't have their company pay for these things or go out with business.
, especially if this laboriously created a system for paying these guys breaks down and the u.s. goes away, which i think is right now looking at the headlines there is an equal chance that we are going to walk away from afghanistan and i just -- that really makes my blood run cold because there's been so much effort and sacrifice not just military. .. >> for a these great conversation instead also linda, her book is for sale she will be signing books after word so be sure to get your book she will set here doing that but this was a great conversation also figure for coming and for your great questions. we look forward to use the new next time. [applause] [inaudible conversations] >> host: delighted to be here with husain haqqani read his book just released "magnificent delusions" pakistan, the united states, and an epic history of misunderstanding". delighted to be here with you today. use served as the ambassador as the embassador to pakistan 2008 through 2011 you advised benazir bhutto dow professor at boston university of the director and thuds tin is to he writes extensively for the "
how we do our business on behalf of the u.s. government as well as the u.s. citizens. >> thank you, sir. >> in addition to what my fellow witnesses have had to say, i would just add that we need to make a commitment and effectively ensure that what happens between investigations is something that is tracked. we've had people -- we vet people, we trust them with our classified information and access to sensitive facilities and we have an obligation to ensure that we're looking at people between investigations and taking appropriate corrective action as needed. >> thank you. >> i would say it's unfortunate that the tragedies we saw at the navy yard focuses attention on this process but we have seen the dedicated leadership from these executive branch agencies in the past and when they make their minto and when they make their mind up to take on a problem in father, they do it. and now is the time for actions, not just reviewed words. >> a lot of the folks in the room now that the general accountability office is regarded as a watchdog. an arm of the legislative branch of our governme
will at some point in time be relosed back to communities. reentry is important because for us to manage the the individuals, we have to ensure we are actively ensuring that they are engage in programs within the institution. this is accomplishedded by reentry efforts. i can report that despite all the challenges we -- challenges we have faced over the last 30 years, we are at a point where 80% of the inmates who are released from the bureau prisons do not reside vat within three years. i give credit to the staff who work under these difficult situations, and at the same time, assure we're maintaining safe, secure facilities for the american public. if any consideration could be begin, i think it's looking at the growth. as we are aware, bureau prisons do not control the number of inmates who enter the system, we have no control over the sentencing, but what we have a duty and obligation to do is ensure that for those individuals who are ultimately released do not return to prison because on average about 45,000 inmates are released back into the community, and with the recidivism issues
typically used on the golf course -- gulf coast and those have begun to export refined products into latin america and south america. so it's all about building an infrastructure to connect the production to the consumption. the pipeline transportation is the most efficient and cost-effective way to do that long run. >> host: with all that laying on the table at me turn to viewers. her couple of tweets, one from jody who says there is a whole new industry for renewable nonpolluting forms of energy. why are we scrapping the oil energy and we need or oil, more more gas and more more gas in more things to burn again. that's what makes this economy grow. democratic grow. democratic caller you are up next. go ahead. >> caller: good morning. hearing about how the oil is getting around and they willes on line in logan county are getting oil and gas and i know they are building some gas collection pipelines. where's the gas going around the country? >> guest: in a similar process we typically talk casually about oil or natural gas production but in reality a lot of it is mixed production. at the t
regulations need smart data. but we live in a world where more and more data about consumers is used by businesses and governmental like information security and data privacy must be safe guarded and encouraged by the burrabout you bureau's efforts to address these issues. earlier in year, the cfpb finalized rules to strengthen authori mortgage standards.earlier in y finalized rules to strengthen mortgage standards. these rules were well received, however, i remain interested in hearing from director cordray on how these will improve lending. i look forward to hearing your expectations for compliance with these rules in january especially for small lenders. finally, the committee's exploration of housing finance reform is well under way. as we move forward, i'm interested to hear about your thought on the enter as of your mortgage rules including qm with the new system. and any unintended consequences. with that, i turn to the ranking member. >> thank you, mr. chairman. today we will hear from director cordray on the consumer financial protection bureau semiannual report. this hearin
against a new barbarism in never afraid to use that word and that idea. recognizing islam as a great religion but see no contradiction one dash contradiction to rally the nation to fight the perverted bridge that attacked us on 9/11. i wrote at the time and i believe to this day in bet with the infrastructure that will carry us through this war. it is a backhanded tribute. to the very people that did criticize but they adopted the very same tools as you decrease to them they your administration had created just as truman did to provide the infrastructure, the tools and the institutions that carry us through the cold war and will carry us through in this generation and if i could just repeats i spoke to my wife earlier today she asked me to convey her admiration and respect for what you did for our country, this readiness of your voice and your determination to see things through even when you were nearly alone. i am supposed to be selling books but i had to say that first. [applause] >> especially the white part. otherwise i will sleep on the couch to night. [laughter] the book is ca
is being abused. this is the exactly the place where congressional oversight is useful and necessary. for months now, there have been a steady stream of news stories about the nsa surveillance programs, and yet right now, by law, americans cannot get really the most basic information about what's going on with these programs. consider this. it's been months since the prison program and tfn call records program were revealed to the public, and yet to this day, americans don't know the actual number of people whose information has been collected under those programs. they don't know how many of those people are american, and they have no way of knowing how many of these americans have had their information actually seen by government officials as opposed to just being held in a data base. the administration has taken good steps in good faith to address this problem, but, and i'm afraid these steps are too little and they are not permanent, and so americans still have no way of knowing whether the government is striking the right balance between privacy and security or whether their pri
was able to be used at the time. you had the oil fields blossoms say 1914-1918 period. at its peak producing 300,000 barrels a day accounting for almost one in every five barrels produced in oklahoma and almost 5% of total u.s. marketed production. it was really just a field.cant booming oil you often think about it, i think about it in modern accounts of what north dakota is experiencing. think about this boom in cushing, as we have had previous successful fields to our north and east between cushing and tulsa, and so as the boom moved its way really became a drilling exploration focused town. the production just far outpaced what could be consumed and it became a gnat ral thought to begin building storage facilities, pipeline gathering facilities, and that so the nascent stages of the nod rn infrastructure that sits behind us this morning. host: what part does it play today in the oil industry? guest: the cushing hub is still violetly important. you think about -- vitally important. think about it, it is a marketplace, it is the marketplace, the benchmark price setting place for
decide to bring into the fold their friends and fellow activist, making many of us honor remembers of the family along the way. there selflessness has had an indelible impact upon me. in some small sense, it can be said that the davis family saved me and countless other abolitionists, human rights advocates, and close friends to learn critical life lessons from them now in turn it is our collective duty to make sure that troy's death was not in vain. we must do our part to save the world by continuing this fight to abolish the death penalty state-by-state and execution by execution. nobody is better placed than they to say why it this is so critical, so i am humbled, proud and honored to introduce troy's middle sister kimberly davis and his and his sister ebony and her daughter, kristin, whom you will hear from later this evening. please join me in welcoming cam. [applause] [applause] >> good evening. i wanted thank you all for coming out on this great event because, as you know, tomorrow will mark the 2-year anniversary of my brothers execution. it has been a long battle, long str
the entire 16 that the u.s. economy. that actually is the essence of liberal overreach. it's what's wrong emanuel said. to waste when he basically said we are going to use this opportunity when we have control of the congress to instituted liberal nationalizing health care. there was no reason to reshape and remake one part of the economy as a way to attack the problem of the uninsured. i think this will in the end, it is very likely to collapse in and of its own weight in the gop has to be ready and conservatives have to be ready to address the moral issue. it's a serious one of the uninsured and we want to make sure all americans have access but there are ways to do it. there are conservative ways to do it, honest ways to do it in which you aren't hiding the cost and pretending and lying about what the effects are going to be if your policy. i think that would be the essence of a conservative answer. i would say in the end that is going to be the outcome. very likely to be the outcome and we have to be prepared to watch a dissolved and have them alternative and i think that will be rela
, interior, u.s. department of agriculture, other agencies of the federal family are going to work with americorps, student conservation association and other veterans groups from around the country to give many more young people these kinds of opportunities that will, in fact, change their lives. so when i was in the grand detons, i had -- tetons, i had the privilege of engaging with a group of people graduating from the national park service academy which is something that the superintendent of that park invented. and these young people from urban areas around the country were talking about their stories. and there was one young man from jackson, mississippi, who was a pretty cool guy, i'll tell ya. and he talked about, first, being so cold when he went will in the springtime because it wasn't like jackson and being there through the summer and riding his bike along the moose wilson road and stopping and looking at the vast tetops and starting to cry. and he said i didn't know why i was crying. but this experience in the outdoors moved him, it changed his life, and it can do so with many, m
use has declined as the economy has grown. cars and trucks are becoming more efficient. all of that is good. at the same time, when you look at the affect that we already see from a destabilizing climate, droughts, wildfires, severe storms, you know that we need to be doing everything we can to accelerate a transition to a clean energy future, and weeks -- when we set the standard that high, that is when the president does not always reach the right marks. the way the president has laid out his priorities from mitigation, both from power plants and mobile sources, cars and trucks, is sound. it is a comprehensive, strategic approach. but, in the face of persistent, unyielding opposition, both from most segments of the republican party, as well as the oil, coal, and gas industries, the president has not always reached -- the strongest long-term view, and sometimes steps back from what actually needs to be done. host: michael brune, let me show you what the president had to say last week, touting his strategy on energy. [video clip] of theave pursued in all above energy strateg
will let us know. clearly there is a connection, however, between what is going on in geneva and what is happening here. if there is a nuclear agreement, if there's an improvement in relations between the united states and iran, between iran and the western community in general, that is going to have an impact on iran's role in the region. and we are focusing today on iran and its eastern neighbors, specifically afghanistan, pakistan and india. while iran is often considered a middle eastern country, in fact, it's historically its cultural ties are as strong if not stronger with its eastern neighbors, with afghanistan and south asia. and, of course, iran will be a pivotal player as it has been all along in afghanistan, especially next year as the united states and nato began to withdraw all its, some if not all of their forces. we are launching a new issue brief this year that have some recommendations for u.s. policy. including a bigger role helping afghanistan manage its water resources, which is a key issue for iran as a downstream neighbor. and the united states can contribute to
and senator inhofe has helped. we have a tremendous group of people who have -- who have helped us. we will have these proceedings presided over by a military lawyer, when possible. the proceedings are going to be recorded. we will prevent victims from being forced to testify in these proceedings. they can have alternative forms of testimony instead. so these are the basic commonsense reforms. and i'm very happy to say that with the strong support we have from so many on both sides of the aisle and with the support of chairman levin, i feel very positive, but to get this done, to stop this revictimmization of people who are just distraught by having been attacked and raped and brutally hurt, we need a bill to come up and we don't need oks to moving forward. we need to move forward with this bill, and i really hope we can. this article 32 reform brings us all together. it brings claire mccaskill and kirsten gillibrand, it brings senator graham and myself. it's just a very bipartisan reform, and there are already several reforms in this bill that we're very proud of, and senator mikulski
and at this point it seems that regardless what degree you have, you are out of work. >> in the next year the u.s. economy will pretty much -- >> i hope by next year it will start to get better. >> i hear it's supposed to be improving but i can tell you how many around me are unemployed and struggling. >> the federal deficit affects us in a personal weight permanently because everything is related to everything trade. >> [inaudible] >> it's more difficult to get a salary of its more difficult to get the benefits. >> the most likely impact of the deficit is fewer job opportunities. >> hopefully in my lifetime it will get better but i fear for my children if this continues to go the way it is. they will have it really rough. >> it definitely affects many people in the country. >> it will cause people to lose trust or a sense of security in our government. >> i think the federal shutdown -- i think that the disappointed people even further. >> i.e. juicy optimism for the future of america. we all just need to get on the same page. >> i would say optimism for we persevere and keep going. we don't giv
to this discrimination. my father used to lead prayers in the mosque. he was a great speaker but he was very broad minded and he also taught me many things and i learned from him so many things. in the same home i had five sisters and none of them got an education. until my high school like could not see any girl in my school in my classroom so you can imagine that education was -- i mean -- in such a situation i was very sensitive to this discrimination. the milk and cream, my sister was given only tea. this kind of discrimination. later on i became more sensitive to these discriminations, and when she was born and girls toward discrimination and crazy about them, boys and girls, women and men are equal and this simple biological difference between men and women should not be for political and social discrimination. i usually tell people -- special training for your daughter, i usually tell people, ask me what i have done, rather asked me what i did not do which was done by parents. i did not clipped her wings to fly. i did not stop her from flying ants for start, they can fly and i always you a message
ambush i have been involuntarily of gillespie is actually used to teach it as an instructor i thought if they are my students i would fail them. was badly put together. are they having a bad day? that i realized after that one day of thinking about it it was not a taliban ambush but a particular village in the valley that was passed about how much aid we had given to other villages they were sending us a message how they felt about our aid prior to rescission that seems like a crazy over reaction we will know that happens all the time that with the assistance we give to afghanistan that is 14 times the size of federal budget is responsible for a substantial amount of what we see on the ground. and in afghanistan doing exactly the surface layer to look beyond what is actually going on that you don't actually see immediately. what i have tried to do in the book is to start that conversation that i had in my head where i started to say there is a deeper level than just the counter insurgency dr. not just about the insurgency fighting a government but a bunch of villages trying to get aut
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 427 (some duplicates have been removed)